Friday, May 04, 2007

Get the File Size

File Size - VBA Function

Sub Get_File_Size()

File1 = "c:\temp\Sample.txt"

MsgBox "The Size of the File is " & FileLen(File1) & " bytes"

End Sub

13 comments:

  1. Anonymous5:30 AM

    thank you

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous5:09 AM

    Is there any way to get the file size when a file is greater than 4GB ?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous7:01 AM

    If your file is over 4GB I'd suggest that VBA and Excel is the wrong medium...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous9:29 AM

    Bad suggestion..

    They didn't say that they had an Excel File bigger than 4GB, just how do I check to see if A (any) file is over 4GB..

    smh

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous2:07 PM

    agreed, very bad suggestion.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous10:19 AM

    If FileLen(FilePathFileName) > 4000000000 Then

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous6:46 AM

    4*1024*1024*1024:)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous8:55 AM

    uhhm.... bytes arend x1000 for a bigger step from bytes to kilobyes...

    you must do X1024

    so 1 kb = 1024 bytes

    what is would say is....

    4000000000 isnt the right value of 4gb

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sub Get_File_Size()

    'Written by VBADUD
    'Respectfully modified/commented by yourexcelguy@gmail.com

    'adapted from http://vbadud.blogspot.ca/2007/05/get-file-size.html
    'Read more at http://vbadud.blogspot.com/2007/05/get-file-size.html#FE4XB444awHluIM6.99

    'I hate that it takes five mouse clicks to get the file size going through Start button, etc.
    'Had to find a better way to do it, found this code.

    'VBADUD's original code looks like this:

    'File1 = "c:\temp\Sample.txt"
    'MsgBox "The Size of the File is " & FileLen(File1) & " bytes"

    'Below are my thoughts and modifications

    'VBADUD's code starts with this line
    'File1 = "c:\temp\Sample.txt"

    'but it require that the user must know, and must change for each file, the file path and name. Not cool.
    ' found the below line at http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/10things/10-ways-to-reference-excel-workbooks-and-sheets-using-vba/967
    'GetActiveWB = ActiveWorkbook.Path & "\" & ActiveWorkbook.Name

    'merged the two ideas to get this below line, which finds the active filepath and filename

    File1 = ActiveWorkbook.Path & "\" & ActiveWorkbook.Name

    'Then VBADUD does the following
    'MsgBox "The Size of the File is " & FileLen(File1) & " bytes"
    ' but it's not easy to read (to me anyway), so I modified it to be more readable to me, per below:

    MsgBox "File size: " & Round(FileLen(File1) / 1000000, 1) & "MB"

    End Sub

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous2:39 AM

      Thanks DA for posting back the solution

      Delete
  10. Anonymous6:40 AM

    The later code will not work because the FileLen function returns Long value which in VBA can only have maximum value of 2,147,483,647.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anonymous6:44 AM

    And also 1 MB is not the same as 1,000,000 bytes (as someone already wrote above)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous11:40 AM

    MsgBox "File size: " & Round(FileLen(File1) / 1048576, 1) & "MB"

    This will give you what you want.

    ReplyDelete

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